The Wawel Dragon (Smok Wawelski), which helped give the city of Krakow its name, breathes fire outside of his cave under Wawel Castle. Legend has it that the dragon was terrorizing the townsfolk back in the day, eating all of their cattle in exchange for not eating them. So the king’s son, Krakus, came up with the genius plan of feeding the dragon a calfskin stuffed with sulfur to blow up his stomach. Visitors today can walk through the dragon’s cave under Wawel Hill, and you used to be able to text a number to make him give a fiery growl, but now he just does it at 5-minute intervals.

The Wawel Dragon (Smok Wawelski), which helped give the city of Krakow its name, breathes fire outside of his cave under Wawel Castle. Legend has it that the dragon was terrorizing the townsfolk back in the day, eating all of their cattle in exchange for not eating them. So the king’s son, Krakus, came up with the genius plan of feeding the dragon a calfskin stuffed with sulfur to blow up his stomach. Visitors today can walk through the dragon’s cave under Wawel Hill, and you used to be able to text a number to make him give a fiery growl, but now he just does it at 5-minute intervals.

The Wawel Dragon (Smok Wawelski), which helped give the city of Krakow its name, breathes fire outside of his cave under Wawel Castle. Legend has it that the dragon was terrorizing the townsfolk back in the day, eating all of their cattle in exchange for not eating them. So the king's son, Krakus, came up with the genius plan of feeding the dragon a calfskin stuffed with sulfur to blow up his stomach. Visitors today can walk through the dragon's cave under Wawel Hill, and you used to be able to text a number to make him give a fiery growl, but now he just does it at 5-minute intervals.

The Wawel Dragon (Smok Wawelski), which helped give the city of Krakow its name, breathes fire outside of his cave under Wawel Castle. Legend has it that the dragon was terrorizing the townsfolk back in the day, eating all of their cattle in exchange for not eating them. So the king’s son, Krakus, came up with the genius plan of feeding the dragon a calfskin stuffed with sulfur to blow up his stomach. Visitors today can walk through the dragon’s cave under Wawel Hill, and you used to be able to text a number to make him give a fiery growl, but now he just does it at 5-minute intervals.

Photo taken at: Smok Wawelski

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